Image: George Hodan
Image: George Hodan

According to a new survey from Hired, the UK is seeing an exodus of tech talent.

 

In fact, the survey found that the UK’s foreign tech talent pool has halved since Brexit voteThis provides further questions of a post-Brexit UK’s ability to attract the world’s best tech talent.

Hired found that the rate at which foreign tech workers accept UK roles has decreased by nearly 20 per cent since the Brexit vote, while UK tech firms recruitment of foreign workers has dropped by 30 per cent.

The percentage of British companies sending offers to candidates outside the country fell from 25 per cent at the beginning of 2016 to just 18 per cent a year later, equating to a decrease of almost 30 per cent.

A worrying, 70 per cent of UK tech workers have considered leaving the UK.

The majority plan to move to other European cities, although North America and Australia also scored high as potential relocation destinations.

85 per cent of UK tech workers believe Brexit could negatively impact country innovation, while 41 per cent of tech workers are less likely to start their own business in the UK as a result of Brexit.

The research found that overall 71 per cent of UK tech workers are concerned about the future, and 72 per cent believe Brexit has already brought uncertainty to the UK’s tech sector.

In a blog post, Mehul Patel at Hired said “Our sense is that many of the more worrisome findings in this post are a result of the current uncertainty characterizing the political landscape. Job seekers and employers are behaving cautiously until they know what the path forward looks like and can plan accordingly. As the UK looks to map out a more definitive plan to leave the EU and things like skilled worker visas come into sharper focus it will give both sides a better understanding of the rules of engagement. Right now, we’re likely seeing the kind of conservative behavior that comes from massive uncertainty.

See also: Cutting immigration to the tens of thousands will devastate the economy