Investing heavily in technology for schools does not improve pupils’ results, according to the OECD.

In fact, the global study found that technology in schools is more likely to lead to lower results. It found that schools in Europe, where the use of tech in the classroom is at its highest, had the lowest results. But the highest achievers, found in Far East Asia, have the lowest use of technology in schools.

The study of more than 70 countries around the world found that heavy investment in tech for schools gives “no noticeable improvement” in reading, maths or science in international Pisa tests.

“If you look at the best-performing education systems, such as those in East Asia, they’ve been very cautious about using technology in their classrooms,” said OECD education director Andreas Schleicher.

“Those students who use tablets and computers very often tend to do worse than those who use them moderately.”

The study found that “there is no single country in which the internet is used frequently at school by a majority of students and where students’ performance improved”.

The UK was not included in the study, but tech analysts Gartner says the global education technology market is worth £17.5 billion, and the UK spends £900 million.

The case for tech

As the use of technology increases and improves in our personal and professional lives, the rise in technology use in schools is intended to better prepare children for their future careers.

Mark Chambers, chief executive of Naace, the body supporting the use of computers in schools, believes that schools should not reduce the use of technology, despite the OECD’s study.

He said: “It is endemic in society now, at home Investing heavily in technology for schools does not improve pupils’ results, according to the OECD.

In fact, the global study found that technology in schools is more likely to lead to lower results. It found that schools in Europe, where the use of tech in the classroom is at its highest, had the lowest results. But the highest achievers, found in Far East Asia, have the lowest use of technology in schools.

The study of more than 70 countries around the world found that heavy investment in tech for schools gives “no noticeable improvement” in reading, maths or science in international Pisa tests.

“If you look at the best-performing education systems, such as those in East Asia, they’ve been very cautious about using technology in their classrooms,” said OECD education director Andreas Schleicher.

“Those students who use tablets and computers very often tend to do worse than those who use them moderately.”

The study found that “there is no single country in which the internet is used frequently at school by a majority of students and where students’ performance improved”.

The UK was not included in the study, but tech analysts Gartner says the global education technology market is worth £17.5 billion, and the UK spends £900 million.

The case for tech

As the use of technology increases and improves in our personal and professional lives, the rise in technology use in schools is intended to better prepare children for their future careers.

Mark Chambers, chief executive of Naace, the body supporting the use of computers in schools, believes that schools should not reduce the use of technology, despite the OECD’s study.

He said: “It is endemic in society now, at home young people will be using technology, there’s no way that we should take technology out of schools, schools should be leading not following.”

However, Mr Schleicher said that the report should not be used as a reason to scrap or reduce the use of tech. Instead, he has called on education systems to introduce more effective ways of harnessing technology in the classroom.

Microsoft spokesman Hugh Milward said: “The internet gives any student access to the sum of human knowledge, 3D printing brings advanced manufacturing capabilities to your desktop, and the next FTSE 100 business might just as well be built in a bedroom in Coventry as in the City.”