DigiJam

Tanya Laird is the founder of Digital Jam and features on the The Fresh Business Thinking Shift 100, MAdtech edition in association with KPMG Small Business Accounting. Digital Jam consults with the entertainment, tech and start-up sectors, including Virtual Reality, film, games, TV, comics and music. Its primary mission to build bridges between different industries and facilitate collaboration and new opportunities. We spoke with Tanya about Digital Jam and how marketing and advertising world is changing.

How do you think advertising and marketing has changed in recent years?

Firstly, I don’t think it’s ‘marketing’ and ‘advertising’ anymore. I think it’s ‘experiences’ and ‘memories’. I also think that nowadays people are more aware of the full scope of every tool available to them and what’s really in that toolkit. The reality is, as marketers we are now behavioural experts. We are identifying ways to influence, change and shift behaviours, by having a genuine understanding of how people experience things and how they form memories and what type of memories we want them to form, which is actually a crucial infrastructure to how one markets and advertises to an audience.

Can you briefly tell me about your business?

We consult with the entertainment, tech and start-up sectors. The core remit of the business is inclusivity and diversity of cross industry expertise. We work with all the entertainment verticals, including Virtual Reality, film, games, TV, comics and the music industry. In the tech sector, we focus on virtual reality, augmented reality and artificial intelligence. We also work with incubators and accelerators across London. Primarily our mission is to build bridges between different industries and facilitate collaboration and new opportunities.

What challenges do marketers face today?

There was a time when the marketer’s role was the voice of the brand, the person of authority who understood the message and the technology used to tell the story. Nowadays anybody can tell a story. For example, in the games industry, anybody can develop a game in their bedroom or garage (with the right tech and skills), as long as they have passion and a clear vision of what it is they want to do. Anybody can create a brand or a product and put it out there in this digital devices era.

What are the future trends for marketing and advertising?

It’s a question of technology and which types of technology are right for the situation. This year everyone wants to talk about Artificial Intelligence, so that is certainly one to look out for. Other areas of interest include personalisation and customisation of data combined with Artificial Intelligence machine learning.

How is your business helping your customers or clients?

We encourage cross sector diversity and collaboration. Within the VR industry for example there are a lot of new entrants to the sector that have come with existing assumptions from other industries (such as film or game industries), by creating open communication between different sectors we are able to bring legacy expertise to the table that wouldn’t otherwise be part of the conversation.

What would be your advice for an entrepreneur starting out?

The single most valuable lesson that anybody can learn, is that opportunities can come in any form, finding and being open to new opportunities and conversations with people that open up new business/revenues is a mental shift that needs to become a lifestyle, a more flexible approach to networking and where value really stems from.

The Fresh Business Thinking Shift 100, MAdtech edition in association with KPMG Small Business Accounting has selected the top 100 innovative companies in the MAdtech industry.