Manchester (2)

The Federation of Small Businesses (FSB) in Manchester and North Cheshire has warned George Osborne that small businesses are starting to lose patience follow a number of regulations and tax burdens in previous Budgets.

Simon Edmondson, the region's FSB chair, has urged the Chancellor to avoid any further big demands on small businesses in the Budget next week.

He said FSB members, particularly in the North West, are looking to Mr Osborne to help them grow and sustain economic growth in the face of emerging global and domestic pressures, and the cumulative impact of previous tax and regulatory changes - highlighting pensions auto-enrolment and the new National Living Wage.

Mr Edmondson said: "The pips are already squeaking, and in the current climate it's crucial the Chancellor uses the Budget to reassure small firms and boost their confidence so they invest, create jobs and drive economic growth.

"This means no new major challenges that drive up costs and burdens. Mr Osborne must also deliver on his promises to overhaul the business rates regime and simplify the tax system."

Mr Edmondson added: "Ahead of the 2015 General Election, the Prime Minister and Chancellor both made unequivocal commitments to FSB members that they would make significant and fundamental changes to the business rates system.

"The current system is unresponsive to economic circumstances, and is viewed as deeply unfair by the business community. While the Chancellor pushes ahead with plans to decentralise business rates, it's absolutely vital the opportunity to introduce a fair nationwide system is not lost."

The FSB has put forward a recommendation that would see businesses with an assessed rateable value of less than £12,000 being removed from the rating system entirely. This would free-up the appeals system from high numbers of low value claims, helping to support cash-strapped local authorities. It would also lift out the smallest businesses."

The FSB has put forward a recommendation that would see businesses with an assessed rateable value of less than £12,000 being removed from the rating system entirely. This would free up the appeals system from high numbers of low value claims, helping to support cash-strapped local authorities. It would also lift out the smallest businesses.

Yesterday (Wednesday), the national FSB called on the Chancellor to not increase fuel duties, claiming “affordable fuel has been a lifeline to those in rural areas”.